Fremantle games record-holder David Mundy has announced he’ll retire at the completion of 2022, after 19 seasons at the Dockers.

Mundy, 37, has played 371 games since making his debut in round six in 2005 and is arguably one of the greatest Fremantle players in its history, joining former teammate Matthew Pavlich and dual Brownlow Medallist Nat Fyfe.

The number 19 draft pick in the 2003 Draft has been a consistent performer for the purple haze, including winning the Doig Medal in 2010 as well as being a part of the All-Australian team in 2015.

Currently the oldest player in the league, Mundy has defied the odds, having one of his better seasons in 2021 and assisting the growth and improvement of youngsters Andrew Brayshaw and Caleb Serong.

The 37-year-old polled 20 Brownlow votes last year, the most of any season in his career.

Mundy told the club of his decision on Monday.

“I’m incredibly proud, I’ve been living my dream for 19 years now and I’ve loved every bit of it,” Mundy said.

“Not all of it has been easy, there’s been quite a few, really hard and emotional bits to it, but I’ve been able to grow as a person and as a player throughout my time at Fremantle and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

“I’m really proud of the person I’ve been able to develop into, the family I’ve been able to create, and my role within the football club. I feel I’ve grown from a skinny full back who didn’t want to talk to anyone, to being a part of the leadership group for a number of years now.

“I’m proud of that growth and that journey and I’m looking to get the most out of this season and explore what’s next.”

Fremantle GM of Football Peter Bell acknowledged Mundy’s contribution to the club over nearly two decades.

“Dave has been a major part of where we are as a club and where we are headed,” Bell said.

“He’s been a big part of the group that we have now. He’s a big part of why we’re very confident for the remainder of this year and the future.

“He’s a great character who understands the bigger picture, understands what the stresses of being a player are, and understands more broadly the other decisions and leadership that we need as a football club.

“I’ve been very thankful, and I know Justin Longmuir has been as well, to have someone like Dave to work with.”

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